WORLD CUP CATWALK

They think it’s all over – it is now! That was some tournament, no? From Alejandro Sabella’s backwards “faint” to the giant grasshopper that alighted on James Rodriguez’ sleeve as he took his penalty against Brazil, we weren’t short of memorable meme-worthy moments. I’ve got several style-skewed armchair-pundit highlights I’d like to share in a doomed attempt to bridge the yawning void till Russia 2018…

 

*Gary Lineker’s glasses. The modish frames combined with the Clooney-esque salt-and-pepper crop to elevate GL into the hallowed-hipster league.

Image courtesy of www.radiotimes.com

Image courtesy of www.radiotimes.com

*Thierry Henry’s cardigans. A smart move to differentiate yourself, panel-wise, from the massed ranks of peer-reviewed, extravagantly-collared open-neck shirts.

 

*Glenn Hoddle’s shorts. Oh my days, as Clarke “down with the kids” Carlisle would undoubtedly say. This ill-advised attempt to “loosen up” ITV’s team with some beachside action only resulted in some excruciating tightening-up that came perilously close to post-watershed camel toe.

Image courtesy of www.brunchnews.com

Image courtesy of www.brunchnews.com

*Angela Merkel’s Final outfit. Beautifully tailored red-and-white Dries Van Noten-esque combo. You’ve got our number, Angela, for any future commissions…

Image courtesy of dapperchap.co

Image courtesy of dapperchap.co

*Rio Ferdinand’s Final outfit. The TE household appreciated his on-trend DB blazer very much, though Rio himself later opined that it made him look like an EasyJet pilot. At least it wasn’t Ryan Air, Rio…

Image courtesy of armradio.am

Image courtesy of armradio.am

*Finally, Sepp Blatter getting roundly booed at the Cup’s presentation. Every great piece of theatre needs a panto villain.

UNCOOL COOL BIZ

Recently I had a communication from my Japanese friend Kawasaki-San, asking me what I thought of the Cool Biz phenomenon – the annual summer campaign in Japan where office workers are encouraged to dress more casually both to keep from overheating and to help reduce air conditioner use – and the growth of the “business casual” style generally. This was the gist of my reply…

 

Hi Kawasaki-San,

As far as I can see, Cool Biz has led to an anonymous corporate look of white short-sleeved shirt with dark lightweight trousers. This is a shame, as no-one has suggested what the alternative could be.

 

On recent trips to Japan I’ve noticed a growth in formal casual wear within department stores like Isetan and shops like Beams and United Arrows. They cover the “business casual” option – blazers, suit separates, print trousers – more than adequately. But what about something more formal? A suit, shirt and tie is still relevant and most appropriate to business formal, but with lighter construction within the tailoring and use of cool wool and ice cotton, one can look elegant as well as comfortable.

 

Savile Row and the “London Gentleman” have long been seen as the aspirational style for men all around the world, as something to reference, emulate, or, more recently, rebel against. Recently I met with a retired Swiss banker who started his career in London in 1972. Most City workers then still wore three-piece pinstripes, bowler hats and gloves. He had long hair and extravagantly-lapelled pastel suits that he wore with dark shirts and kipper ties. His employers hated this look that he and his friends sported but never complained, as they were making money. Maybe this was the start of the decline in formal clothing, when money and rebelliousness took over and traditions started to fade?

 

Next came the “yuppie” in the 1980s who was loud and brash and delighted in flouting convention – remember a 21-year-old banker boasting how he wore a mink coat onto the trading floor.

 

The early 90s brought austerity and a brief return to formality, to be replaced by the “dress down” movement from the US, embraced by Tony Blair when he became Prime Minister in the UK. Suddenly legions of office workers were sporting a new uniform – blazer, chinos, button-down shirt, loafers. It didn’t resonate, and men returned to the suit, but opted to lose their ties – a poor halfway house for those politicians and businessmen still in their formal suits and shirts. This confusion has continued to the present day, in the UK, Japan, and around the world, where many guys still feel trapped in this halfway house and feel they don’t have an alternative.

 

Interestingly, there’s a new younger internet generation who follow street style blogs, soaking up information and shopping on websites like Mr Porter, who now consume many looks and styles. I believe this consumer is happy to wear formal-inspired attire, though a little neater and sharper than business casual – knitted ties, fitted jackets – and is a receptive audience who wouldn’t dismiss the suit and tie as long as it looked sharp and modern and they could alternate it with more casual looks. I don’t believe the pleasure in dressing up has completely disappeared – if anything, it may be one of the most rebellious things left to do, now that dress codes have relaxed so much. We just have to make sure that we continue to educate and enthuse people in the art of dressing well – for every season.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Best,

 

Tim

 

HAIR APPARENT

The Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith once said: “To make a fine gentleman, several trades are required, but chiefly a barber.” I couldn’t agree more, and so, Justin FitzPatrick, aka The Shoe Snob, and myself, thought we’d share our tonsorial technicians with you, should you want to ask for a “Tim” or a “Justin,” come your own next appointment…

Me: I’ve been seeing Richard Stepney at Fourth Floor for, ooh, over twenty years now. We had a lot of friends in common, and I was looking to set up my business, and in fact it was Richard who suggested I contact this guy he knew who had a Huguenot house in Spitalfields – and the rest is haircut history! I love the space at Fourth Floor – it’s so clean and light, on the top floor of an old industrial building in Clerkenwell, and you come up in the vintage goods lift. Richard runs his business very much like mine – he doesn’t impose a house style on anyone, he hates the idea of any kind of hard-sell, and he has people from all kinds of worlds coming in – art, media, lawyers, City execs, architects. He knows exactly what works for me, whether I’m in a buzz-cut or beardy phase, and he’s even been gracious enough to forgive my occasional missed appointments (sorry Richard, it won’t happen again).

Justin: I have never been one to seek out a certain barbershop for it’s prestige reputation. I have always gone to a place by default. For example, I get my hair cut at Geo F. Trumpers and one might think that I go there for their heritage and reputation as one of London’s oldest and most respected grooming salon’s, but in reality I get my hair cut there because my barber had moved there from another grooming locale. I am more attached to trust and the person that cuts my hair then I am to a place and the idea of that place. I would go to a hole in the wall if I knew that the person there understood what I wanted and exactly how to get it. That’s what I gravitate towards: trust in the barber. Once I have found that, I will follow that person to any shop they might move to…..

Timothy Everest & Justin FitzPatrick

Timothy Everest & Justin FitzPatrick

PRESIDENTIAL PALACE

It’s always a pleasure visiting New York for client meetings and fittings, and an especial pleasure when I get to hang out in the remarkable apartment of long-time friend-of-TE John Demsey, President of Estee Lauder. Now The Selby – my favourite through-the-keyhole blog by some distance, and a worthy successor to MTV Cribs – has gone the full nine yards (or, to be more accurate, hundreds of square-footage) through John’s res (he’s looking super-stylish, as ever, in his TE suit and DB blazer) and revealed what makes it so des; from his “London Photo Wall” (loving the 40-winks pic of HMQ) to his Fornasetti Corner, and his penchant, nay borderline obsession, with apes. Minimalist we can safely say it’s not…

derrickjenniferbookspread

http://theselby.com

http://theselby.com

The Selby Book

The Selby Book

INDEPENDENCE DAY

Happy 4th of July! While I can’t deny that it’s a bit of a shame that we lost those colonies across the pond (it would have made queueing at JFK’s passport control so much less onerous) I’ll be metaphorically wrapping myself in Old Glory today by seeking out some prime rib and a Brooklyn Craft Beer (to go with my Brooklyn craft beard).

shutterstock_198025787

To wear: We don’t have any stars, but our black and white striped socks will assert your style independence. Or you could declare your allegiance – while showing off your accessorizing dexterity – by cramming our red, white and blue pocket squares into a suitably accommodating breast pocket.

 

TOUR DE FRANCE

I’m so excited. And I just can’t hide it. I’m about to lose control and I think I like it. Why? Because this year’s Tour – the premier sporting event of the year, for the bike-centrics among us – incorporates stages from Leeds to Cambridge, giving us the chance to cheer on Sir Bradley and Chris Froome over moor and fen, before the competition crosses the Channel.

 

Donning the Timothy Everest + Brooks Boultbee Jacket

Donning the Timothy Everest + Brooks Boultbee Jacket

To wear: Ideally, the yellow jersey, but if not, our John Boultbee Criterion jacket, in collaboration with Brooks, would be a very acceptable tweed-lined, bellow-pocketed, shooting-backed, copper-finished substitute.

 

CUTTING EDGE

I’ve said it many times – tailoring is an art form. Now here’s an artist taking that maxim quite literally, and winning the “Body Electric” Saatchi Art Showdown Prize to (suit and) boot. Hormazd Narielwalla beat over 4000 other entrants with his swooping, colourful collages based on vintage tailoring patterns – think Ellsworth Kelly meets Paul Klee over the cutting table. Congratulations Hormazd, and feel free to come and mix your media at Elder Street at any time.

Le Petit Echo De La Mode by Hormazd Narielwalla

Le Petit Echo De La Mode by Hormazd Narielwalla